There is not enough ground or surface water in California to go around, period. And most likely there never will be as agriculture, fishery, domestic and recreational water demands increase. Even with normal rain/snow seasons todays extremely low aquifers, lakes and reservoirs are unlikely to fill naturally to previous safe working levels. Simply stated California is using more water than nature can provide, and that shortfall will increase every year as US and World demand for California agriculture products continues to grow. California needs a supplemental uninterruptable 24/7 source of water. And with a 1000 mile Pacific Ocean coastline that unlimited water source is available…

Prop 1 will not produce a single drop of new water; it will only manipulate the shrinking supply favoring those that spend the most money and retain the best lobbyists. Prop 1 teases us with lip service suggesting that there is plenty of water but it is not correctly managed and “they will correct that oversight”. Importing more water (and power) from the Pacific Northwest is a short-term fast fading solution. From an environmental and economic standpoint building a couple more Dams is nonsensical. Furthermore it is extremely unlikely that they could be constructed on-time at the present estimate, and the water they may provide is minimal…

Proposition 1 is a $7,500,000,000 (7.5 billion dollar) Pork Barrel, a massive cash distribution to the individuals, corporations and bureaucrats that control California’s water. At one time a hidden cabal but today you can view published lists of those who “proudly” support (and will profit from) the Proposition...

The mind-boggling size of this Bond is beyond the State’s ability to administer and provide crucial oversight, without professional oversight there will be no accountability, meaning that several hundred millions of dollars could easily “fall thru the cracks”, and no one will ever know about it until many years later when another multi-billion $ bond shows up on the ballot promising the same things, then a few people may ask themselves: I thought we paid for all that years ago?  Yes, Virginia, you did indeed…

Now is the time to seriously address desalinization for agriculture (Ag uses 80% of available water) put desalinization on a fast-track, create a multi-billion $ mega-scale program. California aquifer’s must be filled and maintained at high levels allowing open access to “Big Ag” (who already have it and want to keep it all for themselves) and the many small farmers, ranchers, fisheries, recreational facilities and others now struggling for survival. A new supplemental source for water is needed if California is to continue to supply the nation with high quality reasonably priced fruits and veggies and even non-essentials such as wine, almonds and pistachios, and if not California it will be Mexico, South America and China.  Simply dividing up the little water available amongst the entrenched Water Weasels will guarantee that you will soon see lemons from Sicily, oranges from Spain and artichoke from Italy in California markets where at one time inexpensive California fruit and produce once dominated…

Desalinization on a mega-scale level is not cheap, it is a multi-billion $ investment, but when compared to present on-going State and Federal environmental programs that have shown little or no return it amounts to “pocket change”. It is money that must be invested if the State (including all of the people, not just a few) are to prosper…

The water powers that be “The Water Weasels” have ignored in the past and will reject in the future mega-scale Ag desalinization programs because they will not be able to “control” them, a surplus of water is not good for their business, it creates unwanted competition. As the old saying goes “when in doubt follow the money”. California water is all about politics and politics is all about money. It’s like that great old movie “Chinatown” now re-playing on the California 2014 November ballot as Prop1…

http://ballotpedia.org/California_Proposition_1,_Water_Bond_(2014)      www.vonborks.org/links.html